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Tim Misny

Borrowed Vehicle Accidents

PROUDLY REPRESENTING VICTIMS OF BIRTH INJURY, MEDICAL MISTAKES, AND CATASTROPHIC ACCIDENTS THROUGHOUT THE UNITED STATES FOR 38 YEARS

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Nobody expects to be involved in a serious car accident, yet collisions can happen unexpectedly and without any warning at all. While being involved in a traffic collision can be scary under any circumstances, it can be particularly frustrating to realize that you have been involved in a collision with another driver who is in a borrowed car.

You are probably concerned about who will be responsible for your injuries, and who will pay for your losses. As an experienced Cleveland car accident attorney, I want to assure you that you can seek compensation for a borrowed vehicle accident lawsuit, even if the driver does not have his or her own insurance.

What is a Borrowed Vehicle Accident? 

A borrowed vehicle accident refers to a collision in which one of the drivers involved in the crash was in a borrowed automobile. Anytime the driver does not own the car but instead has borrowed it, a collision that occurs while that driver has borrowed the car likely will be a borrowed vehicle accident.

For example, if a teenager borrows a friend’s car and causes a crash, we might describe the collision as a borrowed vehicle accident. Similarly, if a family member such as a sibling borrows a car while visiting relatives and is involved in a crash, we could also describe that wreck as a borrowed vehicle accident.

Who Pays for a Borrowed Vehicle Crash?

Why are borrowed vehicle accidents confusing? Often, a person who is injured by an at-fault driver who borrowed the car might not have his or her own insurance. As such, the injured person might be worried about getting compensation.

However, as the AAA Foundation for Traffic Safety (AAA) explains, car insurance usually follows the vehicle. Accordingly, you should be able to file a third-party claim through the owner of the borrowed vehicle.

If an insurance claim is insufficient, the owner of the vehicle usually is not the party you will sue. Instead, you will likely file a lawsuit against the at-fault driver.

Statute of Limitations for Filing a Borrowed Vehicle Lawsuit

If you need to file a lawsuit against the at-fault driver, you need to keep in mind that Ohio has a two-year statute of limitations on most car accident cases.

For most borrowed accident lawsuits, the clock on the statute of limitations will start to tick on the date of the accident. From that date, you will have two years to get your lawsuit filed. You do not need to complete your lawsuit within this time window, but you do need to officially file your claim. I can help you every step of the way.

Call My Office Today for More Information

Car crashes can happen in any vehicle, and sometimes the driver in a collision is in a borrowed vehicle. It is important to know that borrowing a car does not mean that there is no option for filing an auto insurance claim.

Whether you were involved in a collision caused by another driver’s negligence when you were in a borrowed vehicle, or you were injured by an at-fault driver in a borrowed vehicle, I can help you seek the financial compensation you deserve. Call me today at 877.944.4373 to learn more about the services I provide to injury victims as an experienced Cleveland car accident lawyer. I’ll Make Them Pay!®

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