Deadly Debris on Ohio Roadways

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I was driving down the freeway at at the posted speed limit when a truck in front of me lost an unsecured broom and it went smack into my windshield. After the initial shock, “duck” and recovery – I began thinking about just how dangerous this scenario is. More than a nuisance, debris on the road way poses a serious risk across Ohio. While it may not be the most glamorous topic for the news headlines, recent ODOT reports highlight the serious nature of accidents resulting from discarded items on our highways.

We have all seen them, a small broom or even an entire sofa on the roadside – These preventable issues can save hundreds of lives! Just a broom to the windshield was enough to raise my heart rate, and likely continue to do so for many others traveling behind me on the same stretch of highway. Could you imagine your reaction if a ladder, sofa, or any other item came toward you as you are going 60 miles per hour!?

Debris Causes Thousands of Accidents Each Year

The scary reality is that roadway debris contributes to over 3,700 accidents each year in Ohio. Individuals are injured and killed every day, either by avoiding the debris or coming into direct contact. Even a small item can poise a very large risk at any high rate of speed.

Swerving to avoid an item in the road is incredibly dangerous for you, your passengers and for other drivers around you. The average number of deaths resulting from the 3,700 accidents reaches at least 20 per year – a sad reality for a completely preventable situation. For a 4 year period from 2012-2016 ODOT reports that over 19,000 accidents occurred, causing over 100 deaths – In addition to 570 serious injuries.

The Solution to Debris

Ohio’s tarp law is in place to limit the number of unsecured loads, but it simply just isn’t enough. Individual responsibility and proper tools and education are essential to traveling safely with items loaded in a truck.

Using the proper restraints, like rope or ratchet straps, is recommended for any size load in the back of a pick up truck. Responsible travel and packing is also essential, and common sense truly goes a long way! Saving a small amount of time or travel costs is simply not worth the risk of another individuals’ life.

If you witness a vehicle with an unsecured load, or see an item fall out or already in the road way, contact local authorities immediately. If you are traveling and have lost an item – It is important to stop and call for emergency help.

If you or someone you love has been involved in a serious accident, you must contact my offices immediately.

I’ll be there for you, and I’ll Make Them Pay!®

Author: Tim Misny | For over four decades, personal injury lawyer Tim Misny has represented the injured victim in in birth injurymedical malpractice, and catastrophic injury/wrongful death cases, serving ClevelandAkron/CantonColumbusDayton and neighboring communities. You can reach Tim by email at misnylaw.com/ask-tim-a-question/ or call at 877.944.4373.

 

Safe Driving Practices In Rain and Flash Floods

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As the seasons change, it is important to remember and recognize that with different weather patterns, adjustments need to be made for safe driving. Driving in the rain can be a dangerous endeavor, especially during a risk of flash floods.

Light Rain and Wind:

  • Slow down.
  • Extra caution should be taken even with moderate precipitation.
  • If you have your windshield wipers on, your headlights should be on. This is the law in the State of Ohio.

Heavy Rain and Wind:

  • Excess precipitation can hinder vision and decrease reaction time.
  • Strong gusts of wind can cause a driver to lose steering control.
  • If you must slow down to excess, put you hazards on to alert other drivers of your slow speed.

Flash Floods:

  • Flooding can happen suddenly, quickly, and with no warning.
  • Driving in as little as 6 inches of water can severely damage a vehicle.
  • Driving in 12 inches of water can be dangerous or even fatal for the driver and passengers.
  • It is advisable to re-route and avoid driving through a flooded road.

Moderate adjustments to driving can save one’s vehicle and well-being. If you or a loved one was injured or killed in an automobile accident due to another driver’s negligence, contact my office immediately. As your Ohio car accident attorney, I’ll be there for you, and I’ll Make Them Pay!®

Author: Tim Misny | For over four decades, personal injury lawyer Tim Misny has represented the injured victim in in birth injurymedical malpractice, and catastrophic injury/wrongful death cases, serving ClevelandAkron/CantonColumbusDayton and neighboring communities. You can reach Tim by email at misnylaw.com/ask-tim-a-question/ or call at 877.944.4373.

Teens, Texting and Tragedy

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The new school year is fully underway, which means there are more teen drivers on the road during peak driving hours. A lot of teens prefer to drive to school instead of taking the bus. Teenaged drivers age 15 to 20 make up 6.4 % of total drivers, but are more likely to cause a motor vehicle accident than any other driver. Reasons for this include inexperience, taking risks, and perhaps the most common, distracted driving.

The most well-known form of distracted driving is texting while driving; 42% of teens admit to texting while behind the wheel. Teens also are risky drivers; they are less likely to wear a seat belt, maintain a safe distance and follow traffic laws such as turn signal use and coming to a full stop. Inexperience is inherent. As little as 2 to 3 years of driving experience can dramatically decrease the chance of a teenage driver causing an accident, making 16-17 year old most likely to be involved.

As parents and as fellow drivers, there are some things to keep in mind regarding keeping teen drivers safe.

  • Encourage teens to put their phones in the glove box while driving.
  • Practice driving with your teenaged kids.
  • Teach teens the importance of maintaining their vehicle so it is safe to drive. Examples are: regular tune-ups, tire rotations, new windshield wipers, etc. The safer the car, the safer the driver.
  • Show teens how to be a cautious driver by being one and setting the bar for what safe driving looks like.
  • If anything else, be a defensive driver. Be alert on the road and drive as if you were surrounded by inexperienced drivers.

We can’t control everything teenager’s do behind the wheel, but we can try to encourage safe driving habits.

If you or a loved one was injured or killed in an automobile accident due to another driver’s negligence, contact my office immediately. As your Ohio car accident attorney, I’ll be there for you, and I’ll Make Them Pay!®

Author: Tim Misny | For over four decades, personal injury lawyer Tim Misny has represented the injured victim in in birth injury, medical malpractice, and catastrophic injury/wrongful death cases, serving Cleveland, Akron/Canton, Columbus, Dayton and neighboring communities. You can reach Tim by email at misnylaw.com/ask-tim-a-question/ or call at 877.944.4373.

Distracted Drivers Leading Cause of Teen Death

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Distracted Driving is now the Leading Cause of Death in Teens

A new national program is aiming to make an impact on teen distracted driving.  The lack of real world experience combined with an increased likelihood to be distracted is proving to be a recipe for disaster.

Unfortunately, our teens have more distractions than ever before. The younger generation as a whole tend to lack a true understanding of how dangerous their behavior is, and the potential finality a serious accident may cause. We must do more to protect our teens and to protect other drivers on the road! So many young lives are ending before they have truly ever had a chance to begin.

Tragically, in Northeast Ohio over the last 4 years 5,866 deaths and injuries to teenagers aged 15-19 years occurred.  These accidents were all attributed to distracted driving!  The Ohio Highway Patrol reports Cuyahoga County had the highest number of accidents with over 400,  followed by 100 in Lake County, 65 in Geauga County and 140 in Lorain County.

The Harsh Reality

Studies conducted by The Impact Program report that teen drivers are 4 times more likely to be involved in a fatal crash than adults. Typical harmless behavior is the culprit, and teens are still failing to realize the severity of the problem. When asked at the Impact Program, teens didn’t even consider accidents on the list of fatal/lethal considerations – Despite it being the top cause of death for their age group.

We all have harrowing stories of things we did, got away with and survived.  That feeling of invincibility is undeniable at that age, but it simply isn’t reality. Today, the everyday simple behaviors that are leading to such an increase in accidents are the reason this problem has become so prevalent. An Evel Knievel stunt 20 years ago may have been dangerous, but in reality, these kids are playing the proverbial Russian Roulette with their lies on a daily basis.

Talk About The Everyday Behaviors

Talk to your teen! The seemingly mundane behaviors that are dangerous are easy to overlook. Over 75% of teen accidents can be attributed to the following;

  • Passenger Distractions
  • Social Media
  • Smart Phone Use
  • Music / Playlists
  • Food and Drinks
  • Make up

It is reported that 4,000 teens are killed in car accidents annually across the US with another 400,000 injured.  Of these scary statistics, 50% of those are passengers.  It is just as important to talk to your teen driver as it is to restrict your teen from being a passenger!

Impact for Change Now and for the Future

The Impact Program originated in California and is now used nationwide, including right here in Northeast Ohio! The program resulted as a joint effort after the increase in teen related accidents, and the profound impact it had on the officers, families and communities as a whole.  We have experienced such tragedies right here in Northeast Ohio and families have suffered this unthinkable and preventable tragedies.

The Impact Program is aiming to teach teen drivers now, but also have a great impact on all future drivers.  This could greatly impact the accidents rates, as well as future issues with road rage, distracted driving and more. National insurance brands, health care companies and other major players are also stepping up to the plate, offering safe driving scholarships and additional resources.

Keep your kids safe on the roads, educate your teen drivers and keep your teens out of the passenger seat. If you or someone you love is involved in an accident, contact my offices.

I’ll be there for you, and I’ll Make Them Pay!®

Author: Tim Misny | For over four decades, personal injury lawyer Tim Misny has represented the injured victim in in birth injurymedical malpractice, and catastrophic injury/wrongful death cases, serving ClevelandAkron/CantonColumbusDayton and neighboring communities. You can reach Tim by email at misnylaw.com/ask-tim-a-question/ or call at 877.944.4373.

Sharing the Streets – Averting Roadkill

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Driving is no easy task. Whenever you get behind the wheel, it feels like there are countless things to keep track of. Switching lanes, checking your mirrors, avoiding negligent drivers, the list goes on and on. However, often lost in the chaos of driving are its non-human aspects. Gravel on the streets, potholes and other uncontrollable complications make driving even more stressful than it already is. However, the most important uncontrollable hazard on the road deserves a section of its own.

Unfortunately, no matter how hard we try to push the problem aside, humans aren’t the only living creatures that need to use their physical surroundings to survive. When we build infrastructure, we are encroaching on millions of acres of land that animals live on as well. In fact, roads inadvertently divide previously unified habitats, sometimes making it difficult for animals to access resources without crossing the road. Unfortunately, this occasionally puts humans and animals in direct conflict with one another, leading to roadkill.

Being on the Lookout

In the United States, an estimated one million animals fall victim to car accidents every day. These include deer, raccoons, possums, squirrels, birds, bunnies and various other types of animals. However, before trying to successfully avert roadkill catastrophes on the road, it is vital to understand the problems at it root.

While drivers are usually well prepared for defensive driving techniques involving other drivers, they are often caught unprepared for less common interactions, like the ones resulting in roadkill. There’s no foolproof way to predict when an animal is going to come rushing out of the trees, running directly in front of your car. The unpredictability of these scenarios make roadkill hard to avoid and sometimes even inevitable. Fortunately, there are ways in which you can minimize the likelihood of hitting an animal.

Proceed with Caution

Here are a few tips you can follow to try and avoid roadkill:

  1. Keep an eye out. The best way to check whether or not animals are present is by being aware of your surroundings. If you see any rustling in the bushes or trees nearby then it would be a good idea to slow down and proceed carefully.
  2. Follow the signs. If there’s a sign posted that warns drivers about the presence of deer, or other animals, then slow down and be conscious. Remember that hitting an animal can cause heavy damage to your car as well – it’s in your best interest to play it careful.
  3. Anticipate and react. Large animals will often cross the road in groups. This means that if you see one animal come into your path, then it’s likely that more will follow.

Remember that Mother Nature is responsible for more than just us – try your best to avoid roadkill and safe driving!

If you or a loved one was injured or killed in an automobile accident due to another driver’s negligence, contact my office immediately. As your Ohio car accident attorney, I’ll be there for you, and I’ll Make Them Pay!®

Author: Tim Misny | For over four decades, personal injury lawyer Tim Misny has represented the injured victim in in birth injurymedical malpractice, and catastrophic injury/wrongful death cases, serving ClevelandAkron/CantonColumbusDayton and neighboring communities. You can reach Tim by email at misnylaw.com/ask-tim-a-question/ or call at 877.944.4373.

Click It or Ticket: The Truth Behind Seat Belt Safety

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As a result of a million-dollar ad campaign and heightened awareness from citizens in general, the seat belt dilemma of past years has died down considerably. However, it’s far from gone. Each year, too many drivers are killed in accidents that could very easily been non-fatal. Specifically, the Center for Disease Control and Prevention found that of total drivers killed in accidents in 2016, over half were unrestrained at the time of the collision.

Compare that to data from the Naval Safety Center: 1% of people who were wearing a seat belt were ejected from the car during a crash. Clearly, seat belts make a huge difference when it comes to in car safety – so why don’t more people wear them?

Identifying the Problem

While it seems like second nature to me to buckle up before I drive, there are fair deals of people who don’t share the same opinion. The state of Ohio requires by law that all drivers and front seat passengers must wear their seat belts in a moving vehicle. However, not everyone abides by this law and it can be a significant error resulting in the loss of life.

Here are a few of the primary reasons why people refuse to fasten their seat belts:

  1. “I’m a good driver, I won’t crash.”
  2. “It’s a short ride. I don’t need it.”
  3. “I don’t want to wear one, its uncomfortable!”

Undoing these perceptions is the first step to ensuring that our best safety precaution in crashes serves its role effectively. As much as everyone would like to believe so, no one is invincible. In the event of a crash, it is vital for all of the car’s safety mechanisms to be in full effect. Buckling your seat belt is the first, and most significant, step.

The importance of your seat belt cannot be overstated. Even if its uncomfortable or you’re just going for a shirt drive, don’t compromise your own safety.

Searching for a Solution

Here are a few reasons to keep you seat belts strapped:

  1. What’s to lose? It takes, at worst, a few seconds and very little energy to buckle your seat belt. There is no logical reason to not just go ahead and do it – there’s absolutely no trade off.
  2. Why would you risk everything? Seat belts save lives. In the event of a crash, why would you not want to minimize the likelihood of serious injury or death? The benefits of seat belts clearly outweigh their trivial ‘harms.’
  3. What if the police catch you? If you’re not wearing a seat belt and get pulled over for offense, then expect a ticket. While not wearing a seatbelt isn’t a primary offense, it is a secondary offense for everyone sitting in the front section of the car. Even if you don’t get into a collision, don’t try and push the law.

There is simply no reason to not wear a seat belt. Buckle up and enjoy the ride! If you or a loved one was injured or killed in an automobile accident due to another driver’s negligence, contact my office immediately.

As your Ohio car accident attorney, I’ll be there for you, and I’ll Make Them Pay!®

Author: Tim Misny | For over four decades, personal injury lawyer Tim Misny has represented the injured victim in in birth injurymedical malpractice, and catastrophic injury/wrongful death cases, serving ClevelandAkron/CantonColumbusDayton and neighboring communities. You can reach Tim by email at misnylaw.com/ask-tim-a-question/ or call at 877.944.4373.

Coping with the Troubles of Driver Tailgating on the Road

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With great power comes great responsibility. While having a car may not feel like a big deal, it is certainly a role that offers an immense amount of both power and responsibility. As a matter of fact, a negligent driver can very easily kill someone if not careful and focused. It should come as no surprise then that the pressures that come with driving are very real and very dangerous.

For that reason, it is exceedingly important to make sure that your driving habits are consistent and minimize the risk of getting into accidents. What’s why tailgating – the very antithesis of the aforementioned concept – is such a problem for drivers everywhere. Piling on stress to an already stressful job, tailgating is a significant cause for rear end collisions – the most common form of accidents.

Persistent Bad Habits

Tailgating puts immense pressure on other drivers to go at an uncomfortable speed. Put simply, no one feels safe when the trailing car is close behind – it is incredibly annoying, incredibly dangerous and incredibly unnecessary. Often times tailgating is a futile strategy. For example a car may be traveling at a slower pace because they see a hazard coming up ahead. At that point, as long as the driver is experienced, no one amount of tailgating is going coerce the driver into speeding up.

When you choose to tailgate another car, you voluntarily stick yourself between a rock and a hard place. You either force other drivers to uncomfortably speed up, or stay dangerously close to them. In the end, no one wins!

The negative ramifications don’t end there however. Road rage is a very common aftermath of tailgating for both parties. For the driver being tailgated, they become annoyed and frustrated, as external factors are often the cause for their slower speed. For the driver doing the tailgating, they become annoyed and frustrated if the other car doesn’t speed up enough. Tailgating is truly a lose-lose situation.

How to Look Out for Yourself

Unfortunately, it’s impossible for you prevent other drivers from tailgating. Here are some strategies to use when someone is right on your tail:

  1. Keep your cool. It’s important to not let your emotions get the best of you in these situations. If you don’t feel comfortable then don’t speed up – worry about your own safety and comfort first.
  2. Let them pass. The best way to avert a collision is by getting rid of the problem. If you’re on a straight road, keep right and let the aggressive tailgater pass.
  3. Maintain your speed. Tailgaters might feel uncomfortable trying to pass you if your speed fluctuates or is inconsistent, perpetuating the problem. Maintaining a constant speed will hopefully allow the driver to pass, ridding the issue at hand.
  4. Don’t tap your brakes. It may make intuitive sense to tap on your brakes in order to “warn” the tailgater to draw back. However, doing so is extremely risky as it could startle the other driver, setting off a chain reaction of negative events.
  5. Pull over. If the aggressor just won’t stop, then sometimes you have no choice but to cave in. Pull over to the side of the road – if safe – and let the driver pass you. Start driving again when it becomes clear.

As long as you keep conscious of both the dangers of tailgating and commit to the previous tips, driving can be a less stressful experience for all of us!

If you or a loved one was injured or killed in an automobile accident due to another driver’s negligence, contact my office immediately. As your Ohio car accident attorney, I’ll be there for you, and I’ll Make Them Pay!®

Author: Tim Misny | For over four decades, personal injury lawyer Tim Misny has represented the injured victim in in birth injurymedical malpractice, and catastrophic injury/wrongful death cases, serving ClevelandAkron/CantonColumbusDayton and neighboring communities. You can reach Tim by email at misnylaw.com/ask-tim-a-question/ or call at 877.944.4373.

The Dangers of Listening While Driving

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The dangers of texting and driving, using apps like Snapchat while driving, and yakking while driving are all well documented and accounted for. However, a rather ignored dilemma is listening while driving. Whether it be through the radio, an external stereo system, or a phone, listening while driving is a growing problem with the expansion of the digital world.

Most drivers fallaciously believe that as long as they can see the road, they should be safe to drive. However, this is not the case. Keeping all of your senses engaged – not just your eyesight – is absolutely vital to having a safe driving experience. Your ears have to be just as focused as your eyes when you’re on the road.

A Plethora of Problems

Much like other forms of distracted driving, listening and driving has evolved from its early stages. Internal car radios – a pain to adjust  – have been distracting drivers since the early 20th century and are still a problem today. The Sony Walkman, and a series of different Apple devices have also functioned as the primary source of music in the car in the decades that followed.

Nowadays, however, there are a number of troubling trends that threaten to make the roads even more dangerous. Most shockingly, more and more drivers are beginning to use their headphones while driving. Not only does this block out all external noises, it also let’s the driver’s mind roam free, taking his/her focus away from the road. In fact, any form of music in the car diverts the driver’s mind from what’s actually important.

Researchers from the Journal of Accident Analysis and Prevention have found that listening to music causes a significant increase in the amount of driving errors – especially in inexperienced drivers.

This isn’t to say that you shouldn’t listen to music at all. While that may be ideal, it’s quite unrealistic and even I enjoy listening to music in the car. However, we should remember that everything is good in moderation: you just have to know how to control yourself.

Excess in Moderation

Cutting out your poor listening and driving habits is easier said than done. Hopefully, the following tips can help reduce your risk of getting into an accident:

  1. Keep it low. You should always be able to hear to what’s going on around you – don’t compromise your alertness for music. Your sense of hearing can alert you to a problem with your car, or some sort of emergency situation outside – it is a vital component of driving.
  2. Prepare beforehand. If you’re using a phone to listen to music, then create a playlist before you get into the car. Listening and driving can be very similar to texting and driving when you have to pay attention to your phone in order to switch the song. Prepare beforehand and you should be fine.
  3. Be smart. It is never a good idea to drive with headphones plugged in. Use common sense and don’t make decisions that will obviously put you in harm’s way.

As long as you learn to control yourself, jamming out in your car should no longer be a problem!

If you or a loved one was injured or killed in an automobile accident due to another driver’s negligence, contact my office immediately. As your Ohio car accident attorney, I’ll be there for you, and I’ll Make Them Pay!®

Author: Tim Misny | For over four decades, personal injury lawyer Tim Misny has represented the injured victim in in birth injurymedical malpractice, and catastrophic injury/wrongful death cases, serving ClevelandAkron/CantonColumbusDayton and neighboring communities. You can reach Tim by email at misnylaw.com/ask-tim-a-question/ or call at 855.800.0384.

 

Activating Your Night Vision on the Road

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For the most part, drivers understand how to adjust their driving based off the weather.

Seasons change, climates change, road conditions change. However, seasonal differences are far from the only external factor, which should alter a driver’s perception of the streets. There is an often-underappreciated aspect of Mother Nature, which arguably has more influence than the climate on driving. This aspect is the time of day.

It is exceedingly important to recognize the difference between driving in the daylight and driving in the dark. To sum up the difference, despite there being 60% less road traffic at night, 40% of fatal accidents occur during this time of day. Night driving is abundantly more dangerous and it’s vital to understand why.

Amplified Hazards When Driving at Night

Its not that night driving magically creates more dangers, rather it’s that the normal everyday perils of normal driving become more pronounced. For example, animal crossings are always a risk for drivers regardless of the time of day. However, animal activity increases dramatically in the later hours, making it more likely that a negligent driver will cause a collision with an animal.

Most importantly, the nighttime reduces the visibility level of drivers. Intuitively, if you can’t see the road as clearly, then driving becomes much more dangerous. With reduced visibility, it’s more difficult to avoid both moving and stationary hazards.  Worse still, with less people on the road, drivers start to feel a false sense of security. They become ignorant of imminent dangers and begin to drive recklessly.

How to Adjust to Nighttime Driving

The qualms of nighttime dangers are very real and need to be considered before getting on the road. Fortunately, following these tips can help quell your fears:

  1. Always use headlights. In the reduced visibility of the nighttime, it is vital to be able to see as much of the road as you possibly can. Always have your headlights turned on so you can be as prepared as possible to avoid upcoming dangers.
  2. Slow down. As noted previously, hazards become much more pronounced in the nighttime. Don’t let the presence of less drivers on the road fool you – the risk for an accident is much greater during the latter half of the day. Slow down and proceed carefully at all times.
  3. Respect the law. It’s tempting to think that less of a police presence at night means that you can run stop signs and red lights. First of all, that’s not true. Second of all, for the sake of your own moral sanctity, follow the law.
  4. Keep both eyes open. Your circadian rhythms are in full effect in the night. In your rush to get home and sleep, remember to not put your life at risk. If you feel sleepy, then pull over and take a nap. Lowered visibility levels already make seeing the toad more difficult – your drowsiness should not.

As long as you follow the basic rules of the road, night driving shouldn’t be an issue for you! For younger, inexperienced drivers, nighttime driving should be reduced unless there is an experienced driver in the vehicle with them. If you or a loved one was injured or killed in an automobile accident due to another driver’s negligence, contact my office immediately.

As your Ohio car accident attorney, I’ll be there for you, and I’ll Make Them Pay!®

Author: Tim Misny | For over four decades, personal injury lawyer Tim Misny has represented the injured victim in in birth injurymedical malpractice, and catastrophic injury/wrongful death cases, serving ClevelandAkron/CantonColumbusDayton and neighboring communities. You can reach Tim by email at misnylaw.com/ask-tim-a-question/ or call at 877.944.4373

 

Speed Demons – Our Own Worst Enemy

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Driving is exhilarating. It’s fun, it’s exciting and it’s liberating. Unfortunately, while driving is certainly all of the aforementioned adjectives, one more adjective can perfectly describe it as well – dangerous. It seems that as time goes on, more people view driving less as a practical mode of transportation, and more as a thrilling pastime.

While this shift can be interpreted in a positive manner, it is also frightening in its own right. Speeding was already a problem in the past, but now – with more and more people seeking to have a fun time – it’s getting worse. The Governors Highway Safety Association found that speeding is now a significant cause in over one third of all traffic accidents.

Chasing the Thrill

The allure of speeding is both easy to see and easy to fall into. People often feel constrained by what they perceive to be “slow” speed limits and don’t see the problem with going slightly over to reach their destination. After all, if you need to get somewhere quickly, just speed up! Unfortunately, there are a plethora of problems with this fallacious attitude.

Speed limits are in place for a reason. Lawmakers don’t just randomly assign limits – they are carefully calculated based on the surrounding area and its general activity. Even lawmakers understand that 25 miles per hour is slow, but these “slow” limits are often necessary due to the chaotic nature of those areas. Even if you don’t cause a collision by speeding, there’s a high likelihood that you’ll get ticketed – a headache no one wants.

Further complicating the problem, drivers often have a mentality that it’s ok to drive slightly over the speed limit.

While its unrealistic to expect drivers to always drive below the speed limit all the time, this mentality becomes dangerous as people start getting progressively looser and looser with the law. By breaking habits like these, you can encourage prudent driving on the streets.

How to Stay Within the Law

Just because everyone does it, doesn’t mean you have to too – here are a few easy tips on how to check yourself before you wreck yourself!

  1. Leave early. One of the predominant factors playing into why drivers tend to speed is because they’re in a rush. By leaving early, or on time, you can eliminate one of the primary pressures to speed.
  2. Use cruise control. Cruise control allows your car to stay at one speed without fluctuations. It’s an extremely useful tool on straight, clear roads. However, only use it under the correct circumstances.
  3. Be afraid of tickets. Make avoiding tickets a legitimate goal. Police are present in basically every area – by doing this you’ll have added motivation to stop speeding. After all, no one wants to pay.
  4. Emotional turmoil can dramatically influence your driving speed. Relaxing before you get in the car can reduce inadvertent reasons to drive erratically.
  5. Find fresh releases. Racing games, or other similar forms of exhilaration can lessen your desire to speed. The one difference being that you have countless lives in video games, while you only have one in real life.

Where there’s a will, there’s a way – lets keep our streets safe!

If you or a loved one was injured or killed in an automobile accident due to another driver’s negligence, contact my office immediately. As your Ohio car accident attorney, I’ll be there for you, and I’ll Make Them Pay!®

Author: Tim Misny | For over four decades, personal injury lawyer Tim Misny has represented the injured victim in in birth injurymedical malpractice, and catastrophic injury/wrongful death cases, serving ClevelandAkron/CantonColumbusDayton and neighboring communities. You can reach Tim by email at misnylaw.com/ask-tim-a-question/ or call at 877.944.4373