What is the difference between Traumatic Brain Injury and Hypoxic-Anoxic brain Injuries?

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It is a common belief that a brain injury can only be caused by a blow to the head. However, there is another category of brain injury that has nothing to do with getting hit in the head. It can be caused without any trauma and can be far more serious than a traumatic brain injury.

Hypoxic-Anoxic brain injuries occur when the flow of oxygen to the brain is stopped or slowed. The brain is deprived of the oxygen it needs to function, resulting in serious brain damage, seizures, coma, cerebral palsy, or even brain death.

  • Hypoxic Brain Injury is caused by partial lack of oxygen to the brain
  • Anoxic Brain Injury is caused by complete lack of oxygen to the brain

So, what can cause lack of oxygen to the brain? How do hypoxic-anoxic brain injuries happen?

  • Head trauma
  • Anesthesia complications or mistakes
  • Drowning
  • Carbon-monoxide poisoning
  • Suffocation
  • Cardiac arrest
  • Strangling
  • Choking
  • Drug overdose

Hypoxic-anoxic brain injuries can be catastrophic. Recovery can take months, years, or in many cases, the person will never completely recover.  Many will need extensive and costly around-the-clock care for the rest of his/her life.

All brain injuries, no matter how they occur, are traumatic. They forever alter the lives of those who experience them, and the lives of their family members. If you or someone you love endured a traumatic brain injury as the result of someone else’s mistake and/or negligence, you need to see me right away.

The victim of a traumatic brain injury faces life-long consequences, and if the injury could have been prevented, I will fight for the compensation he or she needs to carry on with life after a brain injury.

Call me today for a FREE consultation at 1 (877) 944-4373. We can discuss your injury at a time and place that is convenient for you. As your personal injury lawyer, I’ll be there for you, and I’ll Make Them Pay!®

Author: Tim Misny | For over 34 years, personal injury lawyer Tim Misny has represented the injured victim in birth injurymedical malpractice, and catastrophic injury/wrongful death cases, serving “ClevelandAkron/Canton, Columbus & Cincinnati, Ohio.” You can reach Tim by email at tmisny@misnylaw.com or call at 1 (877) 944-4373.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Are Cognitive Problems Common After a Traumatic Brain Injury?

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Suffering a traumatic brain injury changes your life and the lives of your family members. It can alter your personality, your ability to focus and process information, as well as your personal relationships. Cognitive problems are one of the most common effects of traumatic brain injury.

Cognition is defined as a person’s mental action and ability to know, think, remember, understand, and use information. Specifically, the following cognitive problems often affect victims of traumatic brain injury:

  • Language and Communication – Trouble with conversations, finding correct words, rambling, difficulty communicating feelings
  • Attention and Concentration – Difficulty finishing projects or multi-tasking, easily distracted
  • Planning and Organizational problems – Difficulty planning and otherwise organizing
  • Reasoning, Problem Solving and Judgement – Difficulty recognizing problems, bad judgement, trouble analyzing information
  • Embarrassing, Impulsive or Inappropriate Behavior – Denying any cognitive problems, lacking social boundaries
  • Processing and Understanding Information – Trouble following movies, tv shows, slower reaction time, slow to complete routine tasks

If you experienced a traumatic brain injury and are suffering from cognitive problems, you need rehabilitation. Many factors determine how a person will improve cognitively, and it is nearly impossible to predict recovery. However, experience has shown that with proper rehabilitation, some or all cognitive problems associated with traumatic brain injury can improve to varying degrees.

Learning to accept that your traumatic brain injury has changed you is incredibly important for recovery.  Allow your family to help you. Trust them when they recognize cognitive changes, and seek treatment, medically and emotionally. Taking these steps will help you face your traumatic brain injury head on.

Traumatic brain injuries are devastating, and recovery is a journey that requires the help of many. If you or someone you love suffered a traumatic brain injury that was the result of someone else’s error and/or negligence, call me today at 1 (877) 944-4373.

As your Ohio catastrophic injury lawyer, I’ll be there for you, and I’ll Make Them Pay!®!

Author: Tim Misny | For over 34 years, personal injury lawyer Tim Misny has represented the injured victim in birth injurymedical malpractice, and catastrophic injury/wrongful death cases, serving “ClevelandAkron/Canton, Columbus & Cincinnati, Ohio.” You can reach Tim by email at tmisny@misnylaw.com or call at 1 (877) 944-4373.

Traumatic Head Injuries Cause NFL Players to Hang Up Their Cleats

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I was very happy to learn of San Francisco 49ers linebacker Chris Borland’s announcement of his early retirement from the NFL at the young age of 24. His proactive concern for the long-term adverse effects of traumatic brain injury (TBI), ultimately initiated a chain-reaction among his fellow athletes.

In the past year alone, several NFL players have announced their retirement due to head trauma or related injuries:

• San Francisco 49ers linebacker Patrick Willis

• Tennessee Titans quarterback Jake Locker

• Pittsburgh Steelers linebacker Jason Worilds

• Seattle Seahawks wide receiver Sidney Rice

I have been practicing law in Ohio for over 34 years and, as you can imagine, many of my clients suffered a traumatic brain injury. Every time a closed head injury is sustained, it accelerates the onset of brain injury symptoms including; memory loss, depression, and dementia.

What I’d like to see:

A mandatory educational program for young high school football players [and all other sports,] that requires each student-athlete to spend a day at a traumatic brain injury trauma center. An athletes’ exposure to the risks and long-term effects of brain trauma will help him make an educated decision about playing football and/or other contact sports.

My prediction is this: as we gain access to more and more clinical studies, it is becoming a truism that closed head injuries are an inevitable by-product of football. Of equal importance is the new data that clearly demonstrates just how severe, permanent, and debilitating closed head injuries are.

While clinical data in and of itself is very educational, nothing is more compelling than the emotional testimony of former football players

When you watch Tony Dorsett talk about how his once proud existence has been reduced to a nearly full-dependency on others just to get by, one has to ask themselves, “Is it worth it?”

I blogged in January of 2015 wherein I said this is just the tip of the iceberg. That tip continues to emerge, and as it does the hardcore evidence will put football on any level—pro, college, high school and pop warner leagues—in the exact same category as cage fighting.

It is incumbent upon parents and coaches to fully disclose the inevitable consequences of this crazy violent game to their children and players, respectively. If they don’t they will most assuredly be the subject of civil and/or criminal prosecution.

Let’s face it—football is a sacred cash cow for a plethora of professional, college and high school programs. So how can we reduce the number of sports – induced traumatic brain injuries?

While flag football does not offer the crowd-pleasing violent impact of the traditional game, the action is fast and furious. Most importantly, the incident of closed head/traumatic brain injuries is exponentially reduced.

Be proactive like Borland and Rice, and understand the implications of sports-induced head injuries! The only way to reform sports-related brain injury guidelines is to educate our children, parents, and athletic staff on the dangers of traumatic brain injuries caused by contact sports. We must work together to find ways to minimize the injury risks associated with contact sports.

Is a traumatic brain injury worth it?

Chris Borland’s answer wasn’t just “no”; it was “hell no”!

If you or a loved one was a victim of traumatic brain injury, you have to call me right away 1 (877) 944-4373. I can help you get the compensation you deserve. As your Ohio catastrophic injury lawyer, I’ll be there for you, and I’ll Make Them Pay!®

Author: Tim Misny | For 34 years, personal injury lawyer Tim Misny has represented the injured victim in birth injury, medical malpractice, and catastrophic injury/wrongful death cases, serving “Cleveland, Akron/Canton, Columbus & Cincinnati, Ohio.” You can reach Tim by email at tmisny@misnylaw.com or call at 1 (877) 944-4373.

Common Causes of Traumatic Brain Injury and How to Prevent Injury

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Traumatic brain injuries are the leading cause of death and disability in children and young adults. In the United States, traumatic brain injury occurs every 16 seconds. During Traumatic Brain Injury Awareness Month, I want to discuss prevention.

How can you or those you love prevent a traumatic brain injury from occurring?

The three most common causes of traumatic brain injury are: falls, motor vehicle accidents, and recreational activities. No matter what causes your head injury, the consequences are the same. However, each type/cause of traumatic brain injury requires different steps for prevention.

How to Prevent Falls:

  • Be aware of your surroundings.
  • Use hand rails when walking up and down stairs.
  • Make sure there is adequate lighting in your living space.
  • Clear obstacles from walking areas.
  • Where sensible shoes (especially in the Winter months).
  • Examine the area around you before proceeding.
  • Avoid complicated walkways.

Motor Vehicle Accident Prevention:

  • Always obey all traffic laws.
  • Wear seat belts at all times.
  • Be aware of your surroundings.
  • Engage in defensive driving, don’t trust the other drivers around you.
  • Do not drive while tired, ill, or under the influence of drugs or alcohol.
  • When possible, help prevent others from driving under the influence.
  • Avoid distracted driving, including texting and driving.
  • Avoid bad weather and night driving when possible.

 Preventing Recreational Head Injuries: 

  • Always where a helmet when engaging in recreational activities, such as bicycle riding, horseback riding, four wheeling, skiing, snowboarding, and contact sports.
  • Follow all rules when visiting parks (water parks, beaches, playgrounds, skate parks)
  • Learn the correct techniques when engaging in any physical activities.
  • Don’t over-exert yourself. Know your limits.

Knowledge about traumatic brain injury can save a life. Fast action and quick treatment can significantly increase your chance of survival and ability to recover after a traumatic brain injury. Let Traumatic Brain Injury Awareness Month be the catalyst for change, as we shine a light on this issue.

If you or someone you love suffered a traumatic brain injury, you need to call me right away at 1 (877) 944-4373 to schedule a FREE consultation to discuss your injury and whether it could have been prevented.  As your personal injury lawyer, I’ll be there for you, and I’ll Make Them Pay!®

Author: Tim Misny | For over 34 years, personal injury lawyer Tim Misny has represented the injured victim in birth injurymedical malpractice, and catastrophic injury/wrongful death cases, serving “ClevelandAkron/Canton, Columbus & Cincinnati, Ohio.” You can reach Tim by email at tmisny@misnylaw.com or call at 1 (877) 944-4373.

 

Immediate Treatment After a Traumatic Brain Injury May Save a Life

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All head injuries, no matter the severity, require immediate medical treatment. Brain injuries can’t be reversed, but quick medical attention can prevent further damage and/or life-long consequences.

Immediate medical care after a traumatic brain injury is necessary to prevent brain damage and abnormal body function.

After a traumatic brain injury, there are certain actions that may need to be taken. For example, traumatic brain injury can often restrict the amount of oxygen. It is important to make sure the victim of TBI receives adequate oxygen to the brain to avoid brain damage, and to ensure the body continues to function correctly after the injury.

Some medication may be needed immediately after a traumatic brain injury:

  • Anti-seizure drugs – Seizures can be a consequence of traumatic brain injury and occur following the initial injury. Seizures can cause further damage to the brain, so anti-seizure medication is prescribed to further protect the injured patient.
  • Coma-inducing drugs – Doctors may use drugs to induce a temporary coma, so an injured brain does not have to work so hard to maintain normal function.
  • Diuretics – After a traumatic brain injury, patients may experience swelling of the brain. Diuretics will reduce the amount of fluid in the body, thus relieving brain pressure.

After a traumatic brain injury, surgery may be necessary to minimize damage to brain tissue such as:

  • Repairing a skull fracture
  • Removing blood clots
  • Opening an area in the skull to drain and relieve brain pressure

Rehabilitation after a traumatic brain injury may include:

Most people with serious traumatic brain injury will need extensive rehabilitation. They may need to re-learn simple tasks that you and I take for granted, including talking, walking, and thinking. They will need help performing common daily activities. It is important to begin rehabilitation as soon as it is medically safe. Rehabilitation specialists may include:

  • Psychiatric doctors
  • Occupational therapists
  • Physical therapists
  • Speech and language pathologists
  • Neuropsychologists
  • Recreational therapists
  • Vocational counselors

Traumatic brain injuries are devastating and may require months, years, and even a lifetime of medical care. Recovery is a journey that requires the help of many. If you or someone you love suffered a traumatic brain injury, you need to call me right away at 1 (877) 944-4373 to schedule a FREE consultation to discuss your injury and whether it could have been prevented.  As your injury lawyer, I’ll be there for you, and I’ll Make Them Pay!®

Author: Tim Misny | For over 34 years, personal injury lawyer Tim Misny has represented the injured victim in birth injurymedical malpractice, and catastrophic injury/wrongful death cases, serving “ClevelandAkron/Canton, Columbus & Cincinnati, Ohio.” You can reach Tim by email at tmisny@misnylaw.com or call at 1 (877) 944-4373.

Traumatic brain injury; are youth sports worth the risk?

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It’s March, which means it is Traumatic Brain Injury Awareness Month.  I’d like to focus specifically on sports induced brain injuries.  Some tough questions need to be asked about the incidence of brain trauma (concussions) in youth, high school and college athletics.

Extensive research has been conducted on the long-term effects a blow to the head has on children and young adults.  Thousands of young athletes suffer traumatic brain injuries annually, yet society chooses to sweep it under the rug with what is called avoidance behavior. Parents and coaches alike, simply hope that it won’t happen to their player or child. 

Are we voluntarily putting our children at risk by allowing him (and in a few cases, her) to play football?

For now,  let’s focus on football.  Football has the highest concussion rate of all sports.

  • High school football players are twice as likely to get concussions as college football players
  • 20% of high school football players sustain brain injuries.
  • There are 1.3 million high school football players and 2.8 million youth football players.
  • The majority of high school and youth football games have no medical personnel on the sidelines.
  • 40.5% of high school players return to the field prematurely after a brain injury.

The brains of young athletes are still developing, which makes them more prone to brain injury. Some neurosurgeons recommend kids should not play tackle football before the age of 14 or even 16 or 18.

Avoidance behavior can no longer be accepted in youth and high school athletics.  For our kids sake, do we really need to be putting them in a situation where they are hitting their heads on a regular basis?.  The long-term ill affects of traumatic brain injuries are well documented and alarming. Encourage your children to exercise and participate in non-contact sports such as tennis, golf, cross country running, track, and a host of others.  Leave football, hockey, and lacrosse to the adult athlete who is old enough to make their own decisions and assess the risk.

If you or someone you love suffered a traumatic brain injury, you need to call me right away at 1 (877) 944-4373 to schedule a FREE consultation to discuss your injury and whether it could have been prevented.  As your Medical Malpractice lawyer, I’ll be there for you, and I’ll Make Them Pay!®

Author: Tim Misny | For over 33 years, personal injury lawyer Tim Misny has represented the injured victim in birth injurymedical malpractice, and catastrophic injury/wrongful death cases, serving “ClevelandAkron/Canton, Columbus & Cincinnati, Ohio.” You can reach Tim by email at tmisny@misnylaw.com or call at 1 (877) 944-4373.

Does Traumatic Brain Injury Increase Suicide Risk?

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Ohio State football player Kosta Karageorge, who had a history of sports-related concussions, was recently found dead of a self-inflicted gunshot wound to the head. In his suicide note, he specifically noted that “concussions had messed up” his brain.

This month is Traumatic Brain Injury Awareness Month, and it is important to recognize just how deadly traumatic brain injuries can be. Concussions and repetitive head injury syndrome is dramatically affecting the lives of our country’s youth, college, and professional athletes among others.

Long term research has confirmed that concussions lead to chronic traumatic encephalopathy (CTE).  CTE is an incurable, degenerative disease found in people with a history of brain trauma. What is even more frightening is that suicide has been linked to CTE.

Kosta was not the first football player with a history of concussions and brain trauma to commit suicide. Eight more football players, all diagnosed with CTE,  have committed suicide:

Andre Waters – A safety who played for the Pittsburgh Steelers and Cardinals for 11 years. Shot himself in the head November, 2006 at the age of 44.

Terry Long – An offensive lineman for the Steelers killed himself after drinking anti-freeze at the age of 45.

Shane Dronett – A defensive lineman in the NFL for 10 years was found dead of a self- inflicted gun shot wound to the head at age 48.

Ray Easterling – Played for the Falcons from 1972-1979. In 2011, he joined several NFL players in suit against the league over how it handled concussion related injuries. Easterly shot himself in April, 2012 at the age of 62.

Dave Duerson – A safety who played in the NFL for 10 years. Duerson shot himself in the chest after complaining for months of his deteriorating mental state. He left a note requesting that his brain be studied. He died at the age of 50.

Junior Seau – A linebacker in the NFL for nearly 20 years. Seau killed himself with a gunshot to the chest at age 43.

Jovan Belcher – A linebacker for the Kansas City Chiefs, Chargers, Dolphins and Patriots. Belcher shot and killed himself and his girlfriend in 2011. He was just 25.

Paul Oliver – A safety who played for the San Diego Chargers for 4 years shot and killed himself in September, 2013 at the age of 29.

This list is startling evidence of the connection between CTE and suicide.

CTE is also linked to:

  • memory loss
  • impaired judgement
  • depression
  • aggression
  • Dementia

CTE can only be diagnosed after death, which makes it difficult to research the disease. A number of football players have donated their brains to science in hopes that more knowledge will prevent future deaths of the football players and other athletes.

If you or someone you love suffered a traumatic brain injury while playing football or as a results of an accident or other trauma, you need to call me right away at 1 (877) 944-4373 to schedule a FREE consultation to discuss your injury and whether it could have been prevented.  As your Personal injury lawyer , I’ll be there for you, and I’ll Make Them Pay!®

Author: Tim Misny | For over 33 years, personal injury lawyer Tim Misny has represented the injured victim in birth injurymedical malpractice, and catastrophic injury/wrongful death cases, serving “ClevelandAkron/Canton, Columbus & Cincinnati, Ohio.” You can reach Tim by email at tmisny@misnylaw.com or call at 1 (877) 944-4373.

Cleveland Personal Injury Lawyer Supports Traumatic Brain Injury Awareness in March

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March has been designated as Traumatic Brain injury Awareness Month.  In support of this effort, I am going to spend the month of March educating you about this condition that affects so many people. Continue to visit my blog throughout the month to read more about traumatic brain injuries.

First thing’s first, what exactly is a traumatic brain injury?

A traumatic brain injury (TBI) is a an injury to the brain due to a blow, jolt, bump, or penetrating head injury that causes a disruption of the normal function of the brain. In the United states as many as 2.4 million people sustain traumatic brain injuries every year.

The following traumatic brain injury statistics are quite alarming:

  • Traumatic brain injury is the leading cause of death and disability of children and adults, ages 1-44.
  • Approximately 52,000 deaths per year occur as the result of traumatic brain injury.
  • There are an estimated 1.6 million to 3.8 million sports-related TBIs annually.
  • Males are twice as likely to suffer a TBI as females.

The top five causes of traumatic brain injury are; falls, car accidents, struck by or against something, sports-related injuries, and criminal assault.

No two brain injuries are the alike, which means medical care, required treatment, and a rehabilitation plan will be different for every person who suffers  a traumatic brain injury. There are three designated levels of injury: mild, moderate and severe.

  • Mild – Awake; eyes open. Also referred to as a concussion. Symptoms can include confusion, memory and attention difficulties, headache, and behavioral problems.
  • Moderate – Lethargic; eyes open to stimulation. Some brain swelling and/or bleeding causing sleepiness, but still arousable.
  • Severe – Coma; eyes do not open, even with stimulation. Associated with 20-50% death rate and/or severe disabilities.

Knowledge about traumatic brain injury can save a life. Fast action and quick treatment can significantly increase someone’s chances of survival and recovery. Traumatic Brain Injury Awareness Month shines a light on this issue, and I am excited to do my part to further the cause.

If you or someone you love suffered a traumatic brain injury, you need to call me right away at 1 (877) 944-4373 to schedule a FREE consultation to discuss your injury and whether it could have been prevented.  As your Medical Malpractice lawyer, I’ll be there for you, and I’ll Make Them Pay!®

Author: Tim Misny | For over 33 years, personal injury lawyer Tim Misny has represented the injured victim in birth injurymedical malpractice, and catastrophic injury/wrongful death cases, serving “ClevelandAkron/Canton, Columbus & Cincinnati, Ohio.” You can reach Tim by email at tmisny@misnylaw.com or call at 1 (877) 944-4373.

 

Homelessness: A Consequence of Traumatic Brain Injury?

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With March being Traumatic Brain Injury Awareness Month, I want to bring attention to some of the less obvious consequences of traumatic brain injury.

Studies show that at least half of all of the homeless people in the United States have suffered a traumatic brain injury (TBI).

In light of this alarming statistic, it is important to understand the reasons behind the correlation found with TBI and our county’s problem with homelessness.

When a person suffers a concussion or traumatic brain injury, it affects their ability to focus and brings about personality changes. Often, it causes them to have problems at work because they find it difficult to complete some of the tasks they once took for granted. Their family life can suffer for the same reasons. For some, these changes eventually lead to job loss and separation from family; the downward spiral begins.

Take a moment to consider the following traumatic brain injury statistics:

  • 75% of people with TBI were injured before the age of 18
  • Of those who sustained a TBI, 87% were injured before they lost their homes
  • Multiple TBIs are common
  • 66% of individuals sustained a least one TBI from assault
  • 42% of all traumatic brain injuries result from a motor vehicle accident
  • 44% result from a sports injury
  • 42% occur as a result of a fall

This leads me to believe those with traumatic brain injuries may not be getting the proper treatment and rehabilitation. The notion that someone else’s negligence and/or inadequate medical care could completely derail someone’s life; preventing them from becoming productive members of society is simply heartbreaking.

If you or someone you love suffered a traumatic brain injury, you need to call me right away at 1 (877) 944-4373 to schedule a time to come talk to me about your situation. If you know someone whose life has been affected by traumatic brain injury, and you think I can help, reach out.

As your personal injury lawyer, I’ll be there for you, and I’ll Make Them Pay!®

Author: Tim Misny | For over 33 years, personal injury lawyer Tim Misny has represented the injured victim in birth injurymedical malpractice, and catastrophic injury/wrongful death cases, serving “ClevelandAkron/Canton, Columbus & Cincinnati, Ohio.” You can reach Tim by email at tmisny@misnylaw.com or call at 1 (877) 944-4373.

Awake During Surgery: How to Prevent Anesthesia Awareness

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Annually, as many as 40,000 people wake up during surgery and other medical procedures while under anesthesia. Of the patients who wake up, half of them can hear and recognize what is happening, but are unable to communicate, and a third of them can actually feel the pain of the procedure.

As you can imagine, this experience, referred to as Anesthesia Awareness, is incredibly traumatizing for the patient, and often results in mental disorders such as post-traumatic stress disorder, anxiety, and insomnia. Why does Anesthesia Awareness happen, and what can you do to prevent it?

Anesthesia Awareness is caused by:

  • Inadequate Dosages of Anesthesia: Errors in dosage, late administration of anesthesia, failure to recognize signs of Anesthesia Awareness, and therefore, failing to correct the problem, lighter dosage for the patient’s safety
  • Resistance to Anesthesia: Obesity, anxiety, young age, smoking, alcohol and drug abuse, repeated exposure to anesthetics
  • Equipment Malfunctions:  Breathing system malfunctions and disconnections, vaporizer malfunctions, machines providing inadequate dosages

What can you do to keep yourself safe from Anesthesia Awareness?

If you must have surgery, make sure you talk to your anesthetic provider. Discuss the various options for anesthesia, so that you can select the best and safest option for you.

Always be honest and open with your doctors, especially the doctor who will be making decisions regarding your anesthesia.  He or she needs to know your complete medical history to make informed decisions about your anesthetics. You may also have preexisting risk factors for anesthesia resistance.

Waking up during surgery is one of the most frightening experiences.  If you or someone you love suffered from Anesthesia Awareness, and experienced emotional distress as a result, you need to call me at 1 (877) 944-4373 to discuss your experience.

As your Medical Malpractice lawyer, I’ll be there for you, and I’ll Make Them Pay!®

Author: Tim Misny | For over 33 years, personal injury lawyer Tim Misny has represented the injured victim in birth injurymedical malpractice, and catastrophic injury/wrongful death cases, serving “ClevelandAkron/Canton, Columbus & Cincinnati, Ohio.” You can reach Tim by email at tmisny@misnylaw.com or call at 1 (877) 944-4373.